2018                                                                                                             Issue 18


 

BoardWorks International

 
Welcome to Issue 18 of Board Works
 
  
 
Welcome to this issue of Board Works.
 
My apologies to regular readers of Board Works for the delay since the last issue. Life, as they say, has got in the way, forcing regular writing for publication to take a step back. During the interregnum, however, a series of consulting assignments has been a catalyst to go deep into several critical aspects of board effectiveness. I'm looking forward to sharing the results of that exploration in due course.
 
In undertaking client board performance evaluations we find there is an almost universal theme: director dissatisfaction with the way in which boards engage in 'strategic planning'. There are different dimensions to this but in this issue I focus on Why Your Current Strategic Plan Is Probably Little Use as a Governance Tool. I explain why the failure to create a framework within which strategic planning and strategic plan implementation can be carried out successfully is a significant shortcoming of many, if not most, boards in the modern era. It is a failure not unconnected to the matters referred to in the other two articles in this issue.
 
In the latter part of last year the contrasting situations of two different clients prompted me to reflect on the impact boards have on their organisations according to the effectiveness of their choice of chief executive. Typically, a lot of time and effort - and money - go into the recruitment process. Despite that the 'hit rate' in terms of successful appointments is much lower than might be expected. Wondering about that took me back to something I read and, indeed, wrote about, many years ago. In Making a Successful Chief Executive Appointment I reflect on the continuing failure of boards to select real leaders.
 
It is not only in the initial selection of a chief executive that boards unwittingly contribute to chief executive underperformance - or at least a gap between a board's expectations and what is delivered. In Six Ways Boards Undermine Their Chief Executive's Accountability I have described a range of ways in which board actions (or the lack thereof) run counter to generally espoused views on the importance of ramping up chief executive accountability.
 
 
Good reading.
 
Graeme Nahkies
BoardWorks International
 
PS. In Board Works Issue 17 I referred to innovative new software being developed to help small to medium enterprise and not-for-profit boards manage their meetings, board documents and governance responsibilities. I was very pleased to be part of an advisory group that helped guide the development of BoardPro a product that is considerably more useful and affordable than most corporate board portals. I'm very pleased to advise that BoardPro is now fully available and is being successfully (and gratefully) used by hundreds of organisations in 5 countries. Please check out what it can do for your board here. In the future you may see a very occasional direct mail from me regarding this service.

 

 

 
 
In This Issue
Why Your Current Strategic Plan Is Probably Little Use as a Governance Tool
Making a Successful Chief Executive Appointment
Six Ways Boards Undermine Their Chief Executives' Accountability
Have your Say

  For many years there has been a debate about what role the board should play in the development of an organisation's strategic plan. This debate tends to fold into two opposing camps. ...

 

 
Read and Print the full Article

Article2Number18Making a Successful Chief Executive Appointment
 

The contrasting situation of two different clients prompted me to reflect on the impact boards have on their organisations as a consequence of the chief executives they select....
 

 

 
 
  
 
 
 Article3Number18Six Ways Boards Undermine Their Chief Executives' Accountability


Much is said about boards holding their chief executives to account. In reality boards undermine their ability to hold their chief executives accountable at every turn. ..



 
 
14 Art 3   
'An organization is not, like an animal, an end in itself, and successful by the mere act of perpetuating the species. An organization is an organ of society and fulfills itself by the contribution it makes to the outside environment.' 

Peter Drucker


 

 


 

 
 

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